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Catholic Daily Quotes

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Renat Shiryaev
Renat Shiryaev

I'm Not Him


Note for the record: Robert Royal is a Notre Dame fan and Brad Miner roots for Ohio State. But they are in agreement that, while God does not play favorites, we know which one His Mother will favor tonight when the Fighting Irish play the University of Michigan.




I'm Not Him


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What can give us confidence that this is so? For Christians, it is their faith in the incarnation, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The God who can bring good out of the torture and death of His own Son can bring good out of anything.


Have you ever gone to Mass and looked at the faces of the other people, kneeling there, praying devotedly for the dozens of things they need so desperately the way you do for the dozens of things you so desperately need?


Jimmy Valentino has been saved by a miracle - or at least that's what he believes. Given his second chance, Jimmy conveys what he's discovered to other terminally ill patients who, to his astonishment, quickly recover. Jimmy tries to keep his profile and the results of his interventions under the radar but when word spreads, the world converges upon him. A few admire him. Some try to imitate him. Most denounce and disparage what he does as dangerous and sacrilegious. When a patient dies after following what he believes is Jimmy's advice, Jimmy is arrested and prosecuted. With his life in peril once again, Jimmy needs another miracle - one that can't be questioned.


Hundreds of miles away from Saturday's mass shooting at a Walmart in Texas, an Alabama man received a wave of death threats on social media because he has the misfortune of sharing a name with the man suspected of slaying 22 people in El Paso.


"I've got two young kids at the house. I'm worried for our safety and our safety in our home," said Rebecca Calla Toulmin, speaking for her fiance, Patrick Crusius, a 33-year-old salesman from Montgomery, the state's capital city.


Meanwhile, Connor Betts, an 18-year-old in Cleveland, was living an identical nightmare to the Alabama man. Betts was mistaken for another suspected gunman, also named Connor Betts, who is accused of carrying out a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, hours after the El Paso massacre.


A Florida teenager who shares his name with Nikolas Cruz, the suspect in the killing of 17 students and staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, wants to change his name, his mother told the Sun Sentinel newspaper.


Following the 2013 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, law enforcement wrongly identified Ryan Lanza as the gunman. By the time police said the shooter was actually Adam Lanza, Ryan's younger brother, Ryan's picture had been shared thousands of times online.


"Tell Him I'm Not Home" is a song written by Tony Bruno, Brenda Bruno, and Sanford Bellini. The song is about a lover lamenting about a relationship that has lost its flame. It was first recorded by R&B singer Chuck Jackson, and released as a single from his album Encore! on Wand Records in 1963. The single reached No. 42 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 12 on the Hot R&B Singles chart. [1]


Jackson who's currently cashing in "Gettin' ready For The Heartbreak" sends up another striking contender for dual-market chartdom. It's a pulsating, cha cha like romantic heartbreaker, tagged "Tell Him I'm Not Home," that Chuck wrings every once of emotion out of. Standout ork-choral backdrop (with exciting back-and-forth vocal play) conducted by Tony Bruno. The soulful undercut finds a tantalizing rock-a-waltz-like setting. [2]


Ike & Tina Turner covered recorded a version of the song title "Tell Her I'm Not Home." It was produced by Bob Krasnow, head of Loma Records, and released as a non-album track on Loma in 1965. Tina Turner promoted the song on Shindig! in April 1965.[3] The single peaked at No. 33 on the Billboard R&B chart and No. 108 on Bubbling Under The Hot 100.[4][5]


Cash Box (February 13, 1965): "Soulful blues sound follows a telephone talk opening. Could break big in the R&B areas, and spread to a wide range of record buyers. Bob Krasnow produced the tune, and might well see fine results."[8]


Australian singer Normie Rowe's cover of "Tell Him I'm Not Home" was released as a B-side single in November 1965. It peaked at No. 3 on the Australian Singles chart and was a top 5 hit in most Australian mainland capitals, reaching No. 4 in Sydney, No. 2 in Melbourne, No. 2 in Adelaide and No. 1 in Melbourne.[9] The song was ranked the 13th biggest hit of 1965 on the Kent Music Report list of the Top 25 singles for 1965 in Australia.


In the 35 years I've been a relationship counselor and among the thousands of couples I've worked with, at least 25% of them start their sessions with this statement. Although this statement is expressing a real feeling, it can mean many things. It usually takes the client or couple several sessions for them to discover where it falls on the continuum. Is it a part of the normal stages of a relationship, or is it a sign of the relationship is over?


Ending a relationship won't ever be nice or easy. It's painful and hard, which is why some people might try to cushion the blow with statements like "I love you, but I'm not in love with you." They may earnestly care about their partner but simply don't want to continue in the relationship anymore.


Sometimes a person will meet someone new who makes them feel alive, and they realize they don't have that feeling with their current partner anymore. The difference between how they feel about the new person and the current partner may make them come to the conclusion that they're no longer in love with the person they're in the relationship with.


Of course, chances are, they would end up in the very same situation with the new person in the future if they were to enter into a relationship with them. Every relationship will go through lulls. Your aliveness needs to come from within you; that "falling in love" feeling is a chemical high that isn't meant to last forever.


Some people feel they're no longer in love when there's been a lot of conflict. The thing is, everyone has difficulties and parts of their relationship that don't work. All couples have many irresolvable issues, and the difference between the thrivers and divers is not whether they have differences between them (because, seriously, every couple has them) but how they are managed. This happens because we learn the skills to handle it, and the good news is that anyone can learn skills.


We interpret this feeling, which is also about the absence of another kind of feeling, as a sign the relationship is not going to last. Although this may prove to be the truth, it is more likely that it isn't.


We don't stay in that high place all the time. Some days are cloudy, some are stormy, some are gray, and sometimes the sun shines. Relationships are seasonal and cyclical, and the statement, "I'm not in love with my boyfriend" can mean many more things than "it's time to leave." Sex can be rekindled, intimacy can be rediscovered, and depression can be managed.


A long-term relationship has many seasons: Don't interpret that feeling of not being in love as a recipe for disaster but rather as a mystery to explore and find your way through. If you've fallen out of love with your partner and are committed to bringing back the spark, here are your next steps.


Linda Carroll, M.S., LMFT, is a licensed marriage and family therapist and board-certified life coach currently living in Oregon. She received her master's degree in counseling from Oregon State University and has practiced psychotherapy since 1981, specializing in couples and communication. She is the author of the highly acclaimed book Love Cycles: The Five Essential Stages of Lasting Love, which has been translated into four languages, and she regularly teaches relationship courses based on the Love Cycles method at wellness spa Rancho La Puerta in Tecate, Mexico. Her next book, Love Skills, will be available in February 2020.


Lastly, suicide prevention efforts must attend to the multiple types of stigma associated with mental illness and suicide, each of which has been well documented. Firearm owners often manage the stigma associated with ownership along with the stigma of suicide (Blithe & Lanterman, 2017; Melzer, 2009). As Melzer (2009) noted, with continued gun violence occurring in the United States, there is a stigma of owning a firearm in our society which results in dichotomized, political debates about ownership in some communities. Such experiences of stigmas take a toll on mental health and well-being and together can contribute to suicidality (Taylor et al., 2011).


Here we describe the model of developing a research study aimed at addressing the gap in knowledge related to the experiences and understandings of suicide and suicide prevention among diverse firearms owners. This knowledge is needed to appropriately develop prevention. To effectively develop and implement suicide prevention strategies for firearm owners that recognizes that firearm owners are not a homogeneous group, This research utilized a Participatory Action Research (PAR) approach. In Phase 1, we conducted a national U.S. population survey of 2,646 firearm owners (who were minimally required to own at least one handgun, shotgun, or rifle) that gathered data about attitudes, beliefs, and rationale for gun ownership in relation to sociodemographic factors, as well as suicide risk factors. This data informed a Latent Class Analysis of gun owner subgroups to identify subgroups that share similar characteristics and are at elevated risk for firearm suicide. Three subgroups were identified as high-risk and shared certain suicide risk factors: 1) men who are veterans with combat/conflict zone experience; 2) higher LGBTQ+ representation, primarily white, younger, higher socioeconomic status; and 3) women, LGBTQ+, lower socioeconomic status, higher likelihood to be victims of domestic abuse, higher tendency to abuse opioids, chronic pain, PTSD. Phase 1 also included the development and support of an Expert Advisory Board (EAB) for the duration of the project. 041b061a72


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