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Karen Bespalov
Karen Bespalov

Too Long in the Sun: Richard Rives' Book That Challenges and Changes Your View of Christianity



Too Long in the Sun: A Review of Richard Rives' Book




Have you ever wondered about the origins and meanings of some of the most popular Christian holidays and traditions? Have you ever questioned whether they are truly biblical or not? Have you ever felt that there is something missing or wrong with contemporary Christianity?




too long in the sun richard rives pdf 21



If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you might be interested in reading Too Long in the Sun, a book by Richard Rives that exposes the pagan roots of many aspects of modern Christianity and calls for a return to the faith once delivered to the saints.


In this article, I will provide a brief introduction to Richard Rives and his book, a summary and analysis of each chapter, and a conclusion and evaluation of his arguments and evidence. I will also include some FAQs at the end for further clarification and discussion.


Introduction




Who is Richard Rives?




Richard Rives is a speaker, commentator, and author who has been researching and writing about biblical history and archaeology for over 30 years. He is the president of Wyatt Archaeological Research, a non-profit organization that conducts archaeological expeditions in Israel and other countries. He is also the founder of Partakers Publications, a publishing company that produces books and DVDs on biblical topics.


Rives is best known for his book Too Long in the Sun, which was first published in 1996 and has been revised and updated several times since then. He also wrote a sequel called Time is the Ally of Deceit, which expands on some of the themes and issues raised in Too Long in the Sun. He has also produced a six-hour documentary based on his books, which is available on his website toolong.com.


What is the main thesis of Too Long in the Sun?




The main thesis of Too Long in the Sun is that contemporary Christianity has been corrupted by pagan influences and traditions that have nothing to do with the original faith taught by Jesus Christ and his apostles. Rives argues that many of the major elements of modern Christianity, such as Easter, Christmas, Sunday worship, and lawlessness, are derived from ancient sun worship and idolatry, and that they have been deliberately introduced and promoted by false teachers and leaders throughout history.


Rives claims that these pagan practices and doctrines have deceived and misled millions of sincere believers, and that they have caused a great apostasy and falling away from the truth. He warns that these things are not only unbiblical, but also dangerous and harmful to the spiritual health and salvation of Christians. He urges his readers to examine the evidence for themselves, and to repent and return to the pure and simple gospel of the kingdom of God.


How is the book structured?




The book is divided into six chapters, each focusing on a different aspect of the paganization of Christianity. Each chapter begins with a quote from a historical or biblical source that relates to the topic, followed by a brief introduction and overview. Then, Rives presents his arguments and evidence in a clear and concise manner, using various sources such as scriptures, history, archaeology, linguistics, and logic. He also provides illustrations, charts, tables, and photos to support his points and make them more understandable. At the end of each chapter, he summarizes his main findings and conclusions, and poses some questions for reflection and application.


Summary and Analysis of Each Chapter




Chapter 1: The Pagan Origins of Easter




Summary




In this chapter, Rives traces the origin and meaning of Easter, the most celebrated holiday in Christianity. He shows that Easter is not another name for the biblical feast of Passover, but rather a pagan festival that honors the goddess of fertility and spring, who was known by various names such as Ishtar, Astarte, Cybele, or Ashtoreth. He explains that Easter was originally celebrated on the first Sunday after the full moon following the spring equinox, which coincided with the time of the resurrection of the sun god Tammuz or Attis.


Rives reveals that many of the customs and symbols associated with Easter, such as eggs, rabbits, hot cross buns, and sunrise services, are derived from ancient fertility rites and sun worship. He also exposes how Easter was gradually adopted and adapted by the Roman church in the fourth century, under the influence of Constantine and other emperors who wanted to unify their empire under a common religion. He demonstrates that Easter has nothing to do with the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, but rather contradicts and obscures the true meaning and significance of his sacrifice.


Analysis




This chapter is well-researched and well-written, as Rives provides ample evidence from various sources to back up his claims. He also anticipates some possible objections and questions from his readers, such as why Easter is mentioned in the King James Bible (Acts 12:4), or why some early church fathers seemed to endorse Easter. He answers these objections by showing that they are based on mistranslations or misunderstandings of the original texts.


The main strength of this chapter is that it challenges the common assumption that Easter is a Christian holiday that honors the resurrection of Jesus Christ. It shows that Easter is actually a pagan holiday that dishonors him by replacing him with a false god or goddess. It also shows that Easter is not based on the biblical calendar or instructions for celebrating Passover, but rather on a pagan calendar that follows the cycles of nature.


The main weakness of this chapter is that it does not provide much guidance or advice for Christians who want to celebrate Passover instead of Easter. It does not explain how to calculate or observe Passover according to the biblical calendar or instructions. It also does not address some practical issues or challenges that Christians may face when they decide to reject Easter and embrace Passover, such as how to deal with family or friends who still celebrate Easter, or how to find a church or fellowship that supports their decision.


Chapter 2: The Pagan Origins of Christmas




Summary




In this chapter, Rives traces the origin and meaning of Christmas, another popular holiday in Christianity. He shows that Christmas is not the birthday of Jesus Christ, but rather a pagan festival that celebrates the birth of various sun gods on December 25th, which was considered to be the winter solstice in ancient times. He explains that December 25th was chosen as the birthday of these sun gods because it was believed to be the day when the sun began to increase in strength and light after reaching its lowest point in the sky.


```html subjects and to promote their version of Christianity. He demonstrates that Christmas has nothing to do with the birth of Jesus Christ, but rather contradicts and obscures the true meaning and significance of his incarnation. Analysis




This chapter is also well-researched and well-written, as Rives provides ample evidence from various sources to back up his claims. He also anticipates some possible objections and questions from his readers, such as why December 25th is mentioned in some early Christian writings, or why some early church fathers seemed to endorse Christmas. He answers these objections by showing that they are based on unreliable or corrupted sources, or that they were influenced by the prevailing culture and politics of their time.


The main strength of this chapter is that it challenges the common assumption that Christmas is a Christian holiday that honors the birth of Jesus Christ. It shows that Christmas is actually a pagan holiday that dishonors him by replacing him with a false god or goddess. It also shows that Christmas is not based on the biblical evidence or prophecy for the date or season of his birth, but rather on a pagan date that follows the cycles of nature.


The main weakness of this chapter is that it does not provide much guidance or advice for Christians who want to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ in a biblical way. It does not explain how to determine or observe the biblical date or season of his birth, which some scholars suggest could be in the fall during the Feast of Tabernacles. It also does not address some practical issues or challenges that Christians may face when they decide to reject Christmas and embrace the biblical feast, such as how to deal with family or friends who still celebrate Christmas, or how to find a church or fellowship that supports their decision.


Chapter 3: The Pagan Origins of Sunday Worship




Summary




In this chapter, Rives traces the origin and meaning of Sunday worship, another widespread practice in Christianity. He shows that Sunday worship is not the biblical day of rest or worship, but rather a pagan day that honors the sun god. He explains that Sunday was considered to be the first day of the week and the most sacred day in ancient paganism, as it was dedicated to the worship of the sun god and his various manifestations, such as Sol Invictus, Mithra, Apollo, Helios, or Baal.


Rives reveals that many of the customs and symbols associated with Sunday worship, such as sunrise services, halos, crosses, sunbursts, and solar wheels, are derived from ancient pagan art and symbolism that glorified the sun god and his power. He also exposes how Sunday worship was gradually adopted and adapted by the Roman church in the second century, under the influence of Gnostic and pagan teachers and leaders who wanted to compromise with the pagan culture and to distance themselves from the Jewish roots of Christianity. He demonstrates that Sunday worship has nothing to do with the resurrection of Jesus Christ, but rather contradicts and obscures the true meaning and significance of his Sabbath rest.


Analysis




This chapter is also well-researched and well-written, as Rives provides ample evidence from various sources to back up his claims. He also anticipates some possible objections and questions from his readers, such as why Sunday worship is mentioned in some New Testament passages (Acts 20:7; 1 Corinthians 16:2; Revelation 1:10), or why some early church fathers seemed to endorse Sunday worship. He answers these objections by showing that they are based on misinterpretations or misapplications of the original texts.


The main strength of this chapter is that it challenges the common assumption that Sunday worship is a Christian practice that honors the resurrection of Jesus Christ. It shows that Sunday worship is actually a pagan practice that dishonors him by replacing him with a false god or goddess. It also shows that Sunday worship is not based on the biblical commandment or example for observing the Sabbath, but rather on a pagan tradition that follows the cycles of nature.


```html the Sabbath, such as how to deal with family or friends who still worship on Sunday, or how to find a church or fellowship that supports their decision.


Chapter 4: The Biblical Sabbath and the Law of God




Summary




In this chapter, Rives traces the origin and meaning of the Sabbath, the biblical day of rest and worship. He shows that the Sabbath is not a Jewish or legalistic institution, but rather a divine and universal gift that was established at the creation of the world and later reconfirmed to Moses and the Israelites at Mount Sinai. He explains that the Sabbath is the seventh day of the week, Saturday, and not the first day, Sunday. He also explains that the Sabbath is a sign and a memorial of God's creation, redemption, and sanctification of his people.


Rives reveals that many of the benefits and blessings associated with the Sabbath, such as rest, worship, joy, freedom, healing, fellowship, and prophecy, are derived from God's grace and love for his people. He also exposes how the Sabbath was gradually neglected and rejected by many Christians in history, under the influence of false doctrines and traditions that taught that the law of God was abolished or changed by Jesus Christ or his apostles. He demonstrates that the Sabbath is not only valid and relevant for Christians today, but also essential and vital for their spiritual growth and relationship with God.


Analysis




This chapter is also well-researched and well-written, as Rives provides ample evidence from various sources to back up his claims. He also anticipates some possible objections and questions from his readers, such as why the Sabbath is not mentioned in some New Testament passages (Romans 14:5; Colossians 2:16; Galatians 4:10), or why some early church fathers seemed to reject the Sabbath. He answers these objections by showing that they are based on misinterpretations or misapplications of the original texts.


The main strength of this chapter is that it challenges the common assumption that the Sabbath is a Jewish or legalistic practice that is no longer applicable or necessary for Christians today. It shows that the Sabbath is actually a divine and universal gift that is still valid and relevant for Christians today. It also shows that the Sabbath is not based on human traditions or preferences, but rather on God's commandment and example for honoring him as the Creator and Redeemer of his people.


The main weakness of this chapter is that it does not provide much guidance or advice for Christians who want to keep the Sabbath in a biblical way. It does not explain how to avoid legalism or fanaticism when observing the Sabbath, or how to balance between resting and doing good works on the Sabbath. It also does not address some practical issues or challenges that Christians may face when they decide to keep the Sabbath, such as how to deal with work or school obligations that may conflict with the Sabbath, or how to find a church or fellowship that supports their decision.


Chapter 5: The Textual Corruption of the New Testament




Summary




In this chapter, Rives traces the origin and meaning of some of the textual variations and corruptions that are found in some manuscripts and translations of the New Testament. He shows that some of these variations and corruptions are not accidental or insignificant, but rather intentional and significant. He explains that some of these variations and corruptions were introduced by scribes or translators who had an agenda to pervert or distort the meaning of scripture to suit their own beliefs or doctrines.


```html the doctrine of the Trinity, the doctrine of the eternal sonship of Christ, the doctrine of the immortality of the soul, and the doctrine of the rapture. He demonstrates that some of these variations and corruptions have not only changed or added words to the original text, but also changed or added meanings and implications that are contrary to the original message and intent of the authors.


Analysis




This chapter is also well-researched and well-written, as Rives provides ample evidence from various sources to back up his claims. He also anticipates some possible objections and questions from his readers, such as why some of these variations and corruptions are found in some of the oldest and most reliable manuscripts or translations, or why some of these variations and corruptions are supported by some reputable scholars or authorities. He answers these objections by showing that they are based on faulty assumptions or arguments that do not consider all the evidence or factors involved.


The main strength of this chapter is that it challenges the common assumption that the New Testament text is perfectly preserved and transmitted without any errors or alterations. It shows that some of the New Testament text has been corrupted and tampered with by some people who had an agenda to pervert or distort the meaning of scripture to suit their own beliefs or doctrines. It also shows that some of these corruptions have influenced some popular doctrines and traditions in Christianity that are not biblical or sound.


The main weakness of this chapter is that it does not provide much guidance or advice for Christians who want to discern and avoid these textual variations and corruptions. It does not explain how to identify or evaluate these variations and corruptions using reliable methods or tools, such as textual criticism, manuscript evidence, internal evidence, external evidence, or historical evidence. It also does not address some practical issues or challenges that Christians may face when they decide to reject these variations and corruptions, such as how to deal with doubts or confusion about their faith, or how to find a church or fellowship that supports their decision.


Chapter 6: The Sun God Mithra and Constantine's Christianity




Summary




In this chapter, Rives traces the origin and meaning of Mithraism, a pagan religion that worshiped the sun god Mithra and his mother goddess Anahita. He shows that Mithraism was one of the most popular and influential religions in the Roman Empire from the first to the fourth century AD. He explains that Mithraism had many similarities and parallels with Christianity, such as a virgin birth, a baptism, a communion, a resurrection, a judgment day, and a heaven and hell.


Rives reveals that many of the doctrines and practices of Mithraism were adopted and adapted by Constantine and his successors, who claimed to be Christians but were actually devoted to the sun god. He also exposes how Constantine and his successors used their political and religious power to enforce their version of Christianity on the empire, which was a mixture of paganism and Christianity. He demonstrates that Constantine's Christianity was not the faith once delivered to the saints, but rather a new religion that lacked few aspects of Mithraism.


Analysis




This chapter is also well-researched and well-written, as Rives provides ample evidence from various sources to back up his claims. He also anticipates some possible objections and questions from his readers, such as why Mithraism is not mentioned in the Bible or in early Christian writings, or why Constantine's Christianity was accepted by most Christians at that time. He answers these objections by showing that they are based on ignorance or denial of the historical facts or evidence.


```html the first Christian emperor who legalized and promoted Christianity in the Roman Empire. It shows that Constantine was actually a pagan emperor who corrupted and perverted Christianity with Mithraism. It also shows that Constantine's Christianity was not the original and pure Christianity of the first century, but rather a new and polluted Christianity of the fourth century.


The main weakness of this chapter is that it does not provide much guidance or advice for Christians who want to reject Constantine's Christianity and embrace the original Christianity. It does not explain how to distinguish between the true and false doctrines and practices that were introduced or influenced by Constantine and his successors. It also does not address some practical issues or challenges that Christians may face when they decide to reject Constantine's Christianity, such as how to deal with persecution or opposition from the mainstream church or society, or how to find a church or fellowship that supports their decision.


Conclusion and Evaluation




What are the main strengths and weaknesses of Too Long in the Sun?




The main strengths of Too Long in the Sun are:


It is well-researched a


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