top of page

Working Mothers

Public·59 members
Melthucelha Smith
Melthucelha Smith

IEC 60092-502:1999 - Electrical installations in ships - Part 502: Tankers - Special features | Buy Standard



IEC 60092-502: Electrical Installations in Tankers Special Features




Electrical installations in ships are subject to various standards and regulations that aim to ensure their safety, reliability, efficiency, and compatibility. Among these standards, one that is particularly relevant for tankers is IEC 60092-502: Electrical Installations in Ships Part 502: Tankers Special Features. This standard deals with the specific requirements and recommendations for electrical installations in tankers carrying liquids or gases that are flammable, either inherently or due to their reaction with other substances.




Iec 60092 502 Ed 5 0 En 1999 Electrical Installations In Ships Part 502 Tankers Special Features Pdf


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ftinourl.com%2F2ucIMT&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw25UXOQ2tNpwXwwrvRl_PHS



In this article, we will explain what IEC 60092-502 is, why it is important for electrical installations in tankers, what are its main features and objectives, how it is organized and structured, and what are its key requirements and recommendations for electrical systems and equipment in tankers. We will also provide some examples of how this standard has been applied or adopted by different countries or organizations. Finally, we will answer some frequently asked questions about this topic.


Electrical hazards in tankers




Tankers are ships that are designed to transport liquids or gases in bulk. These liquids or gases can be flammable, either inherently or due to their reaction with other substances. For example, some common types of tankers are oil tankers, chemical tankers, liquefied gas tankers, etc.


Electrical installations in tankers are exposed to various sources and types of electrical hazards that can affect the safety of the crew, the cargo, and the environment. Some of these hazards are:



  • Fire: Fire can be caused by electrical faults, sparks, arcs, overheating, short circuits, etc. Fire can spread rapidly and cause explosions, damage, injuries, or fatalities.



  • Explosion: Explosion can be caused by ignition of flammable vapors, gases, or liquids that are present in the cargo tanks, the cargo handling areas, the pump rooms, the engine rooms, etc. Explosion can result in severe damage, injuries, or fatalities.



  • Electrocution: Electrocution can be caused by contact with live electrical parts, faulty insulation, leakage currents, etc. Electrocution can result in shocks, burns, injuries, or fatalities.



  • Corrosion: Corrosion can be caused by exposure to seawater, moisture, chemicals, etc. Corrosion can affect the performance, durability, and integrity of electrical systems and equipment.



  • Interference: Interference can be caused by electromagnetic fields, radio frequencies, static electricity, etc. Interference can affect the communication, navigation, control, and monitoring of electrical systems and equipment.



To prevent and mitigate these hazards, electrical installations in tankers must comply with various regulations and guidelines that are issued by international organizations, national authorities, classification societies, etc. Some of these regulations and guidelines are:



  • International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS): This is an international treaty that sets minimum standards for the construction, equipment, and operation of ships to ensure their safety.



  • International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code): This is an international code that provides standards for the design, construction, equipment, and operation of ships carrying dangerous chemicals in bulk.



  • International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code): This is an international code that provides standards for the design, construction, equipment, and operation of ships carrying liquefied gases in bulk.



  • International Maritime Organization (IMO) Resolutions: These are resolutions that are adopted by the IMO to address specific issues or topics related to maritime safety and security.



  • International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standards: These are standards that are developed by the IEC to provide specifications and guidelines for electrical and electronic technologies and applications.



  • National Standards and Regulations: These are standards and regulations that are issued by national authorities to regulate the electrical installations in ships registered or operating in their jurisdiction.



  • Classification Society Rules: These are rules that are issued by classification societies to certify the compliance of ships with their standards and requirements.



One of the most important and comprehensive standards for electrical installations in tankers is IEC 60092-502. This standard is part of the IEC 60092 series that covers electrical installations in ships in general. IEC 60092-502 focuses on the special features of electrical installations in tankers that carry flammable liquids or gases.


Electrical systems in tankers




IEC 60092-502 provides general requirements and recommendations for electrical systems in tankers. Electrical systems include sources of electrical power, distribution systems, electrical protection, equipotential bonding, static electricity, lightning protection, cathodically protected metallic parts, and electromagnetic radiation. Some of these requirements and recommendations are:



  • Sources of electrical power: Tankers should have at least two independent sources of electrical power that can supply all essential services in case of failure of one source. The sources should be located as far as possible from each other and from hazardous areas. The sources should be protected from fire, explosion, flooding, etc. The sources should have adequate capacity and voltage regulation to meet the normal and emergency loads. The sources should be compatible with the distribution system and the connected equipment.



  • Distribution systems: Tankers should have a distribution system that can distribute electrical power to all consumers safely and efficiently. The distribution system should be divided into main circuits and subcircuits according to their functions and locations. The distribution system should have adequate protection devices such as circuit breakers, fuses, relays, etc. The distribution system should have adequate isolation devices such as switches, disconnectors, etc. The distribution system should have adequate earthing devices such as earth electrodes, earth bars, etc. The distribution system should have adequate monitoring devices such as meters, indicators, alarms, etc. The distribution system should have adequate wiring devices such as cables, conductors, terminals, joints, etc.



should have adequate electrical protection to prevent or limit the effects of electrical faults, overloads, short circuits, earth faults, etc. The electrical protection should be coordinated and selective to ensure the isolation of the faulty part and the continuity of service for the rest of the system. The electrical protection should be tested and adjusted according to the manufacturer's instructions and the system characteristics.


  • Equipotential bonding: Tankers should have an equipotential bonding system that connects all metallic parts that are not intended to carry current but may become live under fault conditions. The equipotential bonding system should reduce the risk of electric shock, fire, explosion, and corrosion. The equipotential bonding system should have a low impedance path to earth and should be connected to the main earthing system. The equipotential bonding system should be inspected and tested regularly.



  • Static electricity: Tankers should have measures to prevent or dissipate static electricity that can accumulate on conductive or non-conductive surfaces due to friction, separation, agitation, etc. Static electricity can cause sparks, arcs, shocks, or interference. The measures should include proper earthing, bonding, shielding, grounding, antistatic materials, etc. The measures should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-32.



  • Lightning protection: Tankers should have a lightning protection system that protects the ship and its electrical installations from direct or indirect lightning strikes. The lightning protection system should divert the lightning current safely to earth and prevent damage, fire, explosion, or interference. The lightning protection system should consist of air terminals, down conductors, earth electrodes, surge protective devices, etc. The lightning protection system should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 62305.



  • Cathodically protected metallic parts: Tankers should have cathodic protection for metallic parts that are exposed to seawater or other corrosive environments. Cathodic protection is a technique that applies an electric current or a sacrificial anode to make the metallic part act as a cathode and prevent corrosion. Cathodic protection can affect the electrical installations in tankers by creating stray currents, potential differences, or interference. Therefore, cathodically protected metallic parts should be electrically isolated from other metallic parts and from the earthing system.



  • Electromagnetic radiation: Tankers should have measures to reduce or eliminate electromagnetic radiation that can affect the electrical installations in tankers by inducing voltages or currents, creating interference, or damaging components. Electromagnetic radiation can be generated by natural sources such as lightning or solar flares, or by artificial sources such as radio transmitters, radars, motors, generators, etc. The measures should include proper shielding, filtering, grounding, distancing, etc. The measures should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 61000.



Electrical equipment in tankers




IEC 60092-502 provides general requirements and recommendations for electrical equipment in tankers. Electrical equipment includes any device that uses electricity for its operation or control, such as motors, generators, transformers, switches, lights, sensors, etc. Some of these requirements and recommendations are:



  • General: Electrical equipment in tankers should be suitable for the environmental conditions and hazards that they may encounter on board. These conditions and hazards include temperature, humidity, vibration, shock, salt spray, dust, water ingress, flammable vapors, gases, liquids, etc. Electrical equipment in tankers should be designed, constructed, tested, and marked according to the relevant standards such as IEC 60092-201.



  • Selection of electrical equipment: Electrical equipment in tankers should be selected according to their intended use and location on board. Electrical equipment in tankers should have adequate protection against ignition sources such as sparks, arcs, or hot spots that can ignite flammable vapors, gases, or liquids. Electrical equipment in tankers should also have adequate protection against mechanical damage that can compromise their integrity or performance.



  • Certified safe type equipment: Electrical equipment in tankers that are intended for use in Zone 0 or Zone 1 (areas where flammable vapors, gases, or liquids are present continuously or frequently) should be certified safe type equipment. Certified safe type equipment is equipment that has been tested and certified by a recognized accredited test laboratory to ensure that it does not create ignition sources under normal or fault conditions. Certified safe type equipment should have a certificate that indicates the protection type, test institute, certificate number, maker, type, gas group, and temperature class. Certified safe type equipment should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079.



  • Electrical equipment of the type n and that which ensures the absence of sparks and arcs and of hot spots during its normal operation: Electrical equipment in tankers that are intended for use in Zone 2 (areas where flammable vapors, gases, or liquids are present occasionally or accidentally) can be electrical equipment of the type n or that which ensures the absence of sparks and arcs and of hot spots during its normal operation. Electrical equipment of the type n is equipment that has been designed and constructed to prevent ignition sources under normal operating conditions. Electrical equipment that ensures the absence of sparks and arcs and of hot spots during its normal operation is equipment that has been designed and constructed to prevent ignition sources by means of special measures such as encapsulation, immersion, filling, etc. Electrical equipment of the type n and that which ensures the absence of sparks and arcs and of hot spots during its normal operation should have a manufacturers conformity declaration that states that the equipment is suitable for installation in Zone 2, declaring conformity with specified standards such as IEC 60079-15.



  • Intrinsically safe electrical equipment: Intrinsically safe electrical equipment is electrical equipment that is designed and constructed to limit the energy of electrical circuits and the surface temperature of components to a level below that which can cause ignition of a specific flammable vapor, gas, or liquid. Intrinsically safe electrical equipment can be used in any zone, depending on its gas group and temperature class. Intrinsically safe electrical equipment should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-11.



equipment should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-7.


  • Pressurized enclosures p: Pressurized enclosures p are enclosures that are designed and constructed to maintain an internal pressure higher than the external pressure and prevent the ingress of flammable vapors, gases, or liquids. Pressurized enclosures p can be used in Zone 1 or Zone 2, depending on their gas group and temperature class. Pressurized enclosures p should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-2.



  • Flameproof enclosures d: Flameproof enclosures d are enclosures that are designed and constructed to withstand an internal explosion of a flammable vapor, gas, or liquid and prevent the transmission of the explosion to the external atmosphere. Flameproof enclosures d can be used in Zone 1 or Zone 2, depending on their gas group and temperature class. Flameproof enclosures d should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-1.



  • Oil-immersed equipment o: Oil-immersed equipment o is equipment that is designed and constructed to be immersed in oil that prevents the ignition of a flammable vapor, gas, or liquid by isolating or quenching sparks, arcs, or hot spots. Oil-immersed equipment o can be used in Zone 1 or Zone 2, depending on its gas group and temperature class. Oil-immersed equipment o should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-6.



  • Sand-filled apparatus q: Sand-filled apparatus q is apparatus that is designed and constructed to be filled with sand that prevents the ignition of a flammable vapor, gas, or liquid by isolating or quenching sparks, arcs, or hot spots. Sand-filled apparatus q can be used in Zone 1 or Zone 2, depending on its gas group and temperature class. Sand-filled apparatus q should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-5.



  • Encapsulated apparatus m: Encapsulated apparatus m is apparatus that is designed and constructed to be encapsulated in a compound that prevents the ignition of a flammable vapor, gas, or liquid by isolating or quenching sparks, arcs, or hot spots. Encapsulated apparatus m can be used in Zone 0, Zone 1, or Zone 2, depending on its gas group and temperature class. Encapsulated apparatus m should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-18.



  • Special protection s: Special protection s is protection that is based on a concept that has been demonstrated to provide an equivalent level of safety to other types of protection for a specific application or environment. Special protection s can be used in any zone, depending on its gas group and temperature class. Special protection s should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-33.



  • Non-sparking motors N: Non-sparking motors N are motors that are designed and constructed to prevent ignition sources by means of special measures such as encapsulation, immersion, filling, etc. Non-sparking motors N can be used in Zone 2, depending on their gas group and temperature class. Non-sparking motors N should comply with the relevant standards such as IEC 60079-15.



  • Temperature classification: Temperature classification is a system that assigns a maximum surface temperature to electrical equipment according to its gas group and ambient temperature. Temperature classification is used to ensure that electrical equipment does not ignite a flammable vapor, gas, or liquid by exceeding its auto-ignition temperature. Temperature classification ranges from T1 (450 C) to T6 (85 C) for gas groups IIA, IIB, and IIC.



  • Marking: Marking is a system that provides information about the electrical equipment such as its protection type, test institute, certificate number, maker, type, gas group, and temperature class. Marking is used to identify and verify the suitability of electrical equipment for a specific hazardous location. Marking should be clear, durable, and visible on the electrical equipment.



  • Installation: Installation is the process of placing, mounting, connecting, and securing electrical equipment in a hazardous location. Installation should be done according to the manufacturer's instructions and the relevant standards such as IEC 60092-502. Installation should ensure the proper functioning, protection, and isolation of electrical equipment.



  • Inspection: Inspection is the process of checking and verifying the condition, compliance, and performance of electrical equipment in a hazardous location. Inspection should be done before, during, and after installation by qualified personnel. Inspection should ensure the conformity, integrity, and safety of electrical equipment.



  • Testing: Testing is the process of applying electrical or mechanical stimuli to electrical equipment in a hazardous location to measure or evaluate its response or behavior. Testing should be done before, during, and after installation by qualified personnel. Testing should ensure the functionality, reliability, and efficiency of electrical equipment.



  • Maintenance: Maintenance is the process of cleaning, repairing, replacing, or adjusting electrical equipment in a hazardous location to preserve or restore its condition or performance. Maintenance should be done periodically or as needed by qualified personnel. Maintenance should ensure the availability, durability, and quality of electrical equipment.



Conclusion




IEC 60092-502 is an important and comprehensive standard for electrical installations in tankers that carry flammable liquids or gases. This standard provides requirements and re


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

  • wryan6
  • Crackps Store
    Crackps Store
  • Crack deck
    Crack deck
  • Crack Trick
    Crack Trick
  • Afzaal Pc
    Afzaal Pc
bottom of page